April Read-A-Thon Updates!

treesofreverie:

Here’s a few quick notes to keep everyone up-to-date on what’s happening with the Read-A-Thon progress leading up to Wednesday’s official starting date:

  • The Official Participants list has now been posted! Unfortunately, nothing else can be added to the list.
  • For those people who didn’t get to…

I’ll be officially taking part in this fabulous April Read-A-Thon! Join us, join us everyone!

drunkkidcatholiic:

The first recorded definition of the word “anthology” was “a bouquet of flowers.”

How poetic is it that we now use “anthology” to refer to collections of written work? The English language is truly a beautiful thing.

Novels aren’t just happy escapes; they are slivers of people’s souls, nailed to the pages, dripping ink from veins of wood pulp. Reading the right one at the right time can make all the difference.
For those of you who are beginning your stories, who might believe, as I once did, when someone tells you there are certain conditions necessary to be a serious writer, a real writer, let me say: I am writing this in a dollar notebook from Staples, with purple gel pen. I can’t believe I’m still at a card table. I am not alone (my youngest is home for spring break with a friend who cannot fly East, and since they are both tall, they have just changed the burned-out porch light bulb), but I am outside, where my neighbors are grilling carne asada, and a homeless man is pausing at the corner with his shopping cart making that shimmery rattle, and I think I’ve finally figured it out.
If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.
This is from Carrie Mae Weems’ “Colored People” project. I’ve been writing a research paper on her for my History of Photography class. We got to choose our topics and I was disgruntled that most people chose either white fashion women photographers, or white male war photographers. To this point, our class over all has only focused on white male photographers (oh, wait one reading packet on women collectively in early photography). So I chose Carrie Mae Weems who is a brilliant black woman who makes a lot of great art and commentary! Then I was so happy to find out that bell hooks had interviewed her! I love bell hooks. She’s one of my favorite writers. So even though this is a little off the book-ish path of what I normally post, I think it’s important for people to see art produced by black women too. And these are some really amazing, smart, inspirational women! Go to Carrie Mae Weems’ website to see some really cool stuff. She also does videography and so much more. 

This is from Carrie Mae Weems’ “Colored People” project. I’ve been writing a research paper on her for my History of Photography class. We got to choose our topics and I was disgruntled that most people chose either white fashion women photographers, or white male war photographers. To this point, our class over all has only focused on white male photographers (oh, wait one reading packet on women collectively in early photography). So I chose Carrie Mae Weems who is a brilliant black woman who makes a lot of great art and commentary! Then I was so happy to find out that bell hooks had interviewed her! I love bell hooks. She’s one of my favorite writers. So even though this is a little off the book-ish path of what I normally post, I think it’s important for people to see art produced by black women too. And these are some really amazing, smart, inspirational women! Go to Carrie Mae Weems’ website to see some really cool stuff. She also does videography and so much more. 

"Art on My Mind: Visual Politics" An Excerpt from a conversation between bell hooks and Carrie Mae Weems
bell hooks:That's exactly why there has to be a challenge to critics to come back to this early work and reconsider ways of seeing and writing about it. In all spheres of cultural production, work by black artists rarely receives sophisticated critical attention from the outset. For example, much of the early critical writing about Toni Morrison's work was terrible. All too often, black artists must reach a certain prominence before the critical writing about their work stops being shallow and superficial.
Carrie Mae Weems:The assumption that our ability as artists is restricted to our only being able to deal meaningfully with the question of race and rage overdetermines critical perception. For instance, I was at a gallery about a year ago, and a white woman was there looking at some of my new pieces, which she bought. Some of the Ain't Jokin pieces and earlier works were pulled for her. I was someplace in the building, checking out some other shit, and girlfriend walks in, she looks at the work, the Sea Island piece. She looks at the work, and finally she asks if she can be introduced to me. They bring me over. She walks over to me, she says, "Is the work angry? But this work is not making me feel guilty." She wants me to tell her how to respond to the work because she assumes that the only legitimate response is guilt in the face of perceived rage.
Sun, Sand and Stories: 10 Books to Read This Summer

Hey guys, I write for a site called The Daily Quirk (full of fun pop culture and news). This is an article I just finished about books coming out this summer. Check it out. Here’s a teaser of five of the ten books that made the list:

1. The Accidental Book Club by Jennifer Scott

2. The Possibilities by Kaui Hart Hemmings

3. The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez

4. The Vacationers by Emma Straub

5. Hungry by H.A. Swain

Know of others? Let me know what I missed!

15 Books About Black Women's History Everyone Should Read

This is a super great list of great books. I encourage you to check it out. Here’s the first five books:

1.Ain’t I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race by Maxine Craig

2.Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South by Deborah Gray White

3.At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle McGuire

4.Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women’s Activism in the Beauty Industry by Tiffany Gill

5.But Some Of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women’s Studies by Gloria T. Hull

A Google found poem.

A Google found poem.

Boo, 4096 took less than an hour to win after my victory over 2048. And I won on the first game. That’s no fun… At least there’s no more to further distract me.

Boo, 4096 took less than an hour to win after my victory over 2048. And I won on the first game. That’s no fun… At least there’s no more to further distract me.

I finally beat this game after six days of struggle. Bring it on 4096! This is why I normally don’t play phone app games, because I’m competitive and it consumes my life until I win! Now I can go back to writing my fifteen page paper.

Confession

I didn’t really like TFIOS. It was okay, but I don’t like predictable plots. I think it’ll be a pretty good movie, and I do want to see it. But I’m going to have to wait until like the very last day before it stops showing so that I don’t have to watch with obsessive fangirls. Or I’ll just redbox it…

http://myheartheartsbooks.tumblr.com/post/82629078664/hopebooksbulldogs-replied-to-your-post-nope-no

myheartheartsbooks:

I’m proud of you. No is such an important thing to learn. I’ve had to use it a lot with one of my internships this semester. They try to give me last minute, unreasonable to complete projects. I had…

1. One of your internships. *stands and gives you a standing ovation*
2. Exactly! Thank you for getting it. I’ve been feeling overwhelmed this last few weeks and I’ve been getting anxiety attacks and one of the deals with my internship was that I’d have a flexible schedule during paper writing weeks (at school), and I told one of my bosses that I needed a break because all my classes had papers due in the same week. I asked for the week off so I could do them and just catch up with school, and he said, “Well…you can have the first day off but I need you to come in the second.” I was annoyed but I signed up for it so I decided that I was just going to have to juggle. Then morning of the first day (the day that I was supposed to have off) he calls and texts me, wanting me to come into this meeting (that isn’t in my field) and makes me come in…like he was doing me a favor. Then that day he asks me to come in on another day the next week which would bump up the number of contact days to three days a week instead of our agreed upon two. So after that, I was like fuck it. I have to put me first because these dudes won’t. But then I talked to my internship coordinator and told him I needed time off and he understood and gave me the week off.

But the point of that overly long story is that if I don’t say no, I have no doubt that they’ll run me dry. So I have to push back against the system. Not to say that the people at my internship are bad people, because they’re really awesome but they don’t understand what I have on my plate and that my internship isn’t my #1 priority.

I completely understand! They really will push you until you put your foot down. And it’s so unhealthy to ignore your own self and what you know you can handle. And so many people do ignore it because of the pressure to succeed and not let others down and because we did sign up for it. And sometimes you do have to push. But more importantly you have to know when to stop. And, and, and I’m just really happy you stopped because it is a lot to deal with. 

I’m hugging you back wherever you are myheartheartsbooks. I’m on your team. 

Anonymous asked: For your book party what about mugs that you write quotes on?

Thanks! That’s a great idea. Especially because I could get reasonably priced mugs for cheap and then decorate them with Sharpies! This would be a lot of fun actually, I’m getting more ideas for how cool these could be as I keep thinking. There’s only six of us girls total so this is very doable. You’re the best anon. 

Keep the book party ideas coming!